Ageing

anti aging patient

Overview

Ageing is universal – The way in which we age is often considered a reflection of our health and self-care, and will affect everyone in slightly different ways. At its core, there are progressive changes in the 4 different tissue types of the face – skin, fat, muscle and bone, that collectively lead to the characteristic signs of ageing > hollowness, sagginess, and wrinkles. Universal collagen loss accelerates the physical manifestations of these changes. Emotionally, these are conveyed to those around us by giving the impression that we appear (And therefore are) tired, sad or angry.

Skin

Our skin undergoes complex changes as we age, and is affected by our genetics and health, and by sun damage (photoageing). Each layer of the skin progresses in different ways, but the hallmark visible manifestations are dullness, pigmentation and vessels, lines and wrinkles, and a dry texture.

The outer layer (Epidermis) becomes thick as dead surface cells accumulate.

The inner supportive layer (Dermis) thins, with blood vessels becoming more prominent.

Sun damage accumulates as pigmentation and dryness, with ultra fine lines leading to an irregular texture.

Collagen and elastin are lost (Especially in women after menopause) leading to a reduction in elasticity, tightness, suppleness, and support. Soft and sagging tissue then develops, distorting the natural facial contours synonymous with youth.

Effective skin treatments target all changes in different ways. Reducing out layer buildup to maintain radiance and texture, reducing vessel prominence and pigment with energy based devices, and restoring collagen to the dermis with energy based devices, biostimulating filler and threads all work to reverse and slow the progression of these features.

Fat

Facial fat is arranged in distinct compartments and layers (A superficial and a deep layer). The deep layer provides support, and suppleness to the face, and typically shrinks with age. The superficial layer in general changes with our weight, and gives soft contour transitions between facial regions. Loss of deep fat and weakening of the facial support structures (Namely collagen loss) leads to hollowness, and sagging of the outer tissue, manifesting as the nasolabial folds, marionette lines, and jowls. Deep fat can be addressed with soft tissue filler to restore lost volume, and sagging superficial fat can be repositioned with threads.

Muscle

Facial musculature primarily exist for three main functions – expression, speech, and eating. Ageing leads to a reduction in muscle volume, and an increase in the degree of resting contraction (Ie – they become tighter). The visible effects of such changes are resting wrinkles, deep folds, neck bands, a drooping nose tip, and an unbalanced chin. Neurotoxin can be used to relax these muscles, and soft tissue filler can provide support beneath them.

Bone

The skeleton of the face is the fundamental support structure of the face. Variation between people contributes substantially to differences in our appearance, including between ethnicities and biological sex.

Loss of bone occurs in a predictable fashion, most often with deepening of the eye sockets (Orbits), and a reduction in jawline prominence – giving a tired and sad appearance. Global bone loss also reduces support to the skin, which, due to gravity, sags.  The first step in most anti-ageing treatments is to restructure the bone that has been lost with age using soft tissue dermal fillers, to provide structural support with which to apply further treatments with more balanced, and natural results.

Collagen

Collagen loss is synonymous with ageing. Of the 28 types, the most relevant to the face is Type 1, being crucial for tissue suppleness, tightness, and elasticity. Treatments designed to reverse ageing focus in restoring lost collagen (The production of which, lasts many years). Energy based devices and mesotherapy can restore collagen to the skin, while biostimulating filler and threads can signal the body to produce collagen for both the skin, and deeper structures. Dr Aaron has selected treatments that lead to the production of mostly Type 1 collagen. There are other similar treatments available, but that lead to Type 3 collagen production (More synonymous with scar tissue rather than youthful elasticity).

Result

Facial ageing is inevitable – however with an evidenced based approach and scientifically proven treatments, visible changes can be slowed, and in cases reversed, leaving you looking refreshed and rejuvenated, and feeling your best.

With such complexity in ageing, developing the best approach can seem overwhelming. Dr Aaron considers high yield treatments done with a tailored protocol with a degree of regularity the most effective and appropriate way to look and feel younger, rested, rejuvenated, and more attractive overall.

Treatments

Different treatment options address the different changes described above. Multiple underlying processes lead to the visible changes we see – this is the basis for the multimodality treatment principle (Combination treatments) to achieve the best, and most natural and harmonious outcome.